During the 2017 LPForum Scholastica presented ways libraries can facilitate the democratization of academic journals beyond library publishing programs. Here's a recap.

If your journal's online publication looks eerily similar to your printed issues, then you have a bit of a problem. This blog post rounds up 3 common journal website mistakes and how to fix them.

Neuroscientists Susana Martinez-Conde and Stephen L. Macknik discuss what individuals and the scholarly community can do to curb the spread of alternative facts.

Scholastica announces the release of Democratizing Academic Journals: Technology, Services, and Open Access, a free-to-read white paper. The paper argues democratization of journal publishing is the key to lowering journal costs and facilitating Open Access.

What will the future of university press journal publishing look like? The University of California Press has been pioneering one possibility with its Collabra journals program.

Björn Brembs explains why he believes journal publishing should be upended from the current model, in which institutions pay publishers for access to content, to one in which the academic community pays for services to publish content and retains ownership of research.

The Journal of New Librarianship team knew they wanted to have a modern publication website, but they didn't have a lot of time to devote to building it. Scholastica journal websites beta allowed them to quickly launch a custom journal website without technical hassles.

When Taylor & Francis discontinued the publication of Internet Mathematics the editors decided to take over the journal. Editor-in-Chief Anthony Bonato shares their experience relaunching the journal on Scholastica.

Clarinda Cerejo, editor-in-chief of Editage Insights, discusses Author Perspectives on the Academic Publishing Process, a new survey aimed at giving authors a voice in debates about the state of journal publishing.

Can an ideal open access publishing model be determined in time to prevent more researchers from losing access to journals? Roxanne Missingham argues embracing a variety of publishing approaches is the answer.