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We've created a new Scholastica Twitter account for all things law review—scholasticaLR. Follow the new account and get the latest law review opening and submission season resource updates!

The University of Michigan's Law School and Mcity project have come together to launch The Michigan Journal of Law and Mobility, to facilitate research at the intersection of mobility and the law. In this interview the journal's managing editor, Ian Williams, shares the details of the publication and the University of Michigan's involvement in the future of mobility law.

Last month, Harvard University Law School's Library Innovation Lab announced the launch of the Caselaw Access Project, an initiative to digitize a collection of 360 years worth of United States court cases. In this interview, Kelly Fitzpatrick, Research Associate at Harvard's Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, discusses the project.

In the summer of 2018, the Dickinson Law Review published its inaugural issue, despite being a 123-year-old publication. In this interview Michael Slobom, editor-in-chief of the journal, discusses its new start.

Deputy district attorney in Marin County California Stanley P. Williams discusses how bias affects judges and jurors and a proposed solution to keep biases out of the courts.

The editor in chief of Capital University Law Review, Avery Moore, discusses their transition to publishing online via Scholastica and how they plan to keep building out the law review's digital presence.

We want to ensure that authors are equipped for submission season success. Here are answers to some frequently asked questions - plus links to some informative resources!

In this post we round up some of the features law review editors benefit from the most, so those not yet familiar can start using them!

In this post we're highlighting some of the features law review authors love the most, so if you aren't yet familiar with them you can start reaping the benefits!

Over a thousand people are killed by fatal force in the US every year. Yet, according to Mitchell Crusto, professor of law at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law, despite the high number of fatal police shootings officers are rarely prosecuted. In this interview, Crusto discusses his research on the use of fatal force and proposals for stronger regulation.