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In this post we round up some of the features law review editors benefit from the most, so those not yet familiar can start using them!

Over a thousand people are killed by fatal force in the US every year. Yet, according to Mitchell Crusto, professor of law at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law, despite the high number of fatal police shootings officers are rarely prosecuted. In this interview, Crusto discusses his research on the use of fatal force and proposals for stronger regulation.

Deborah Farringer, assistant professor of law at Belmont University College of Law, discusses her recent article on Electronic Health Record vendor liability and whether EHR vendors are being held accountable for how their software impacts the quality of patient care.

Leora Eisenstadt, assistant law professor at Temple University, discusses her research on flaws in the way the legal system handles assault and harassment cases, which cause many victims to feel suppressed from seeking justice, and ways to bring about reform.

Gary Lucas, professor of law and executive associate dean for administration and finance at Texas A&M University, discusses his research and recommendations around quantitative legal scholarship assessments.

Harold McDougall, professor of law at Howard University, analyzes why some social justice movements gain more momentum than others and what's needed for movements to engender lasting change.

In this blog post we overview some of our top advice for a more successful law review board transition.

Stanford Law Review's Senior Articles Editor Karen Ding shares how moving the journal's submissions to Scholastica will improve its editorial workflows and article selection process.

We're pleased to announce the Law Editor Learning Center — a one-stop shop for law editors who want to hone their knowledge of how to use Scholastica and, in turn, improve their experience putting their volume together!

There are many misconceptions about what constitutes material that can be trademarked. According to Alexandra Roberts, professor at the University of New Hampshire School of Law, trademarking hashtags is rarely a valid option.