Tag:academic journal production

In this post, we break down five areas of the journal production process where Scholastica's typesetting service is introducing smart automation to help publishers get the article file types they need faster while saving time and costs.

Scholastica announces the release of our first report on The State of Journal Production and Access. The report details the results of a global survey of scholarly society and university publishers on how they are approaching journal production and access now and in the future.

If you haven't had a chance to take The State of Journal Production and Access survey, there's still time — we've extended the deadline to the 5th of June 2020. Learn more about the survey in this blog post.

How are scholarly society, university press, and library publishers currently approaching journal production and access? And what are their future priorities? To help gather collective insights in these areas, Scholastica is conducting a survey on The State of Journal Production and Access.

In this blog post, we share five ways to streamline your journal production process so you can publish high-quality articles faster.

For journals to provide an effective online reading experience for human and machine readers, producing articles in digitally compatible HTML and XML files is becoming paramount.

Jabin White, Vice President of Content Management for JSTOR and Portico, shares his thoughts on how metadata quality can be improved across academia, and how publishers can move from basic metadata concepts to creating enhanced metadata.

In this post, we go behind the scenes of Scholastica's typesetting service, which takes the legwork out of formatting articles by using advanced software to generate HTML, PDF, and XML article files all at once.

In Scholastica's free webinar on-demand, Publishing OA Journals at a Scholarly Society or University, editors and publishers that use Scholastica share their experience developing successful society and university journal publishing initiatives. The webinar focuses on digitally-driven publishing models with case studies from two born-digital journals.

In this interview, Aileen Fyfe, professor of modern history at the University of St. Andrews, shares an abridged history of journal publishing at scholarly societies and her thoughts on how scholarly publishing's past can influence its present.