Tag:online journal publishing

In Scholastica's free webinar on-demand, Publishing OA Journals at a Scholarly Society or University, editors and publishers that use Scholastica share their experience developing successful society and university journal publishing initiatives. The webinar focuses on digitally-driven publishing models with case studies from two born-digital journals.

In this interview, Aileen Fyfe, professor of modern history at the University of St. Andrews, shares an abridged history of journal publishing at scholarly societies and her thoughts on how scholarly publishing's past can influence its present.

As the gatekeepers of research, journals and publishers are arguably on the frontlines of quality in peer review and have the potential to lead the way in addressing many of the challenges faced by the community. In this post, we look at three pillars of peer review at academic journals that can help to build a stronger foundation for quality research.

As societies grapple with questions around how to approach open access publishing, one of the best ways to identify viable options is to look to other societies with successful OA titles. In this post, Emilie Gunn, managing editor for the American Society of Clinical Oncology journals, discusses how ASCO launched it's first fully OA journal.

This month we've made some exciting updates to Scholastica's open access publishing platform, typesetting service, and peer review software. Now journals have the ability to set a default Creative Commons copyright license for all articles published using Scholastica, add author notes to typesetting requests, and more.

Once a scholar finds your open access journal, what can you do to encourage them to come back? Here are four ways to get scholars to frequent your OA journal website with examples from Scholastica's publishing platform.

Metadata 2020's chief coordinator Laura Paglione discusses how the initiative got started and the stakeholders involved. The goal of Metadata 2020 is to understand how metadata is being used throughout the research lifecycle and to develop recommendations for improvement.

Many law reviews are yet to explore all the possibilities of online publishing, and they're missing out on opportunities to better serve authors and readers as a result. Here are three key areas of digital publishing that every law review should prioritize.

While you can't guarantee that your journal will receive top-notch reviewer comments all of the time, there are some steps your editorial team can take to improve reviewer comment quality.

How are the ways that scholars find and engage with academic research outputs changing? In this post we highlight key takeaways from the 2018 How Readers Discover Content in Scholarly Publications report and what the findings mean for journal publishers.