Tag:open access publishing

On Thursday, the 26th of September 2019 at 9:30 AM EST / 1:30 PM GMT Scholastica is hosting a free webinar, Publishing OA Journals at a Scholarly Society or University. During the webinar, editors and publishers that use Scholastica will share their experience launching and developing OA journal programs.

As societies grapple with questions around how to approach open access publishing, one of the best ways to identify viable options is to look to other societies with successful OA titles. In this post, Emilie Gunn, managing editor for the American Society of Clinical Oncology journals, discusses how ASCO launched it's first fully OA journal.

In this interview, lecturer for the Faculty of Law at the University of Malaya Stewart Manley unpacks the FTC v. OMICS case and its broader implications for the oversight of predatory publishing practices.

In this interview Timothy Vollmer, Senior Manager for Public Policy at Creative Commons, discusses the different open copyright licenses Creative Commons offers and the benefits of open copyright in academic publishing.

Once a scholar finds your open access journal, what can you do to encourage them to come back? Here are four ways to get scholars to frequent your OA journal website with examples from Scholastica's publishing platform.

Many law reviews are yet to explore all the possibilities of online publishing, and they're missing out on opportunities to better serve authors and readers as a result. Here are three key areas of digital publishing that every law review should prioritize.

The start of a new year is always a good time for reflection. Before we dive into 2019, we wanted to take the opportunity to look back at some highlights from last year and our plans for the year ahead.

In the wake of Plan S and other recent open access mandates, the need to rethink subscription-based journal publishing models is becoming more pressing for scholarly societies and associations around the world. In this interview, Mikael Laakso, Associate Professor at Hanken School of Economics, discusses his research on ways societies are transitioning journals to OA models.

Today, keeping a current journal website doesn't have to involve learning to use complex content management systems or getting a development team to write custom code. Another option is to use an easy-to-edit website template made for academic journals. In this post, we outline three key benefits of using a website template.

In this recorded webinar publishers and editors share their experience launching new open access journals as well as transitioning paywalled journals to open access publishing models.